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are entitled to tax credits how do you do that to make sure people aren't submitting fraud. do you have an ain't fraud system, what the inspector general said today they think maybe the system is going need some work and beef up security in order to prevent massive fraud here. whenever money is going out from the federal government in big numbers, they found this out in medicare as well, you have to be very careful about fraud because a lot of people will take advantage. >> eamon javers, thank you very much. now, even while the obama care failures and embarrassments continue to pile up, when will the administration finally admit that it's time to hit the pause problem until all the problems are fixed or maybe the pause button is not set to work until november 2014. that may be closer to truth. here former obama campaign aide, he was briefed by the obama white house on the health care and grace marie turner, she will be testifying tomorrow on obama health care. what's the thrust of your testimony going to be tomorrow? >> the president has said that oh, we don't need to worry about those 5% of a
really bad risk pools. all right, so this is going to be budget neutral. not involved with tax payers. what they did not anticipate was that wasn't going on the an isolated problem, but an industry wide problem so then who comes in? the government. i'm sorry did i say if government? i mean the taxpayer. it's a bailout to make sure they don't leave the program after 2014. if they flee the program, the whole edifice begins to collapse. absolutely a bailout. >> as of monday, a good report from "the new york times" and others, as of monday, they're lowering the so-called individual threshold. it used to be $60,000 losses and then the government would help them out and now it's only $45,000. the enrollment is not going to favor the young people. this is a democratic thing. why are you democrats always in bed with the big corporations and this crony capitalism around the big trade you know on the labor? why can't you play it straight? >> and this is the same argument we're having over in the budget world where we don't want to close corporate tax loopholes? >> i want to close corporate tax
which is trying to make a big stink about this suggesting that they wouldn't, for example, allow tax cuts or other types of things for certain companies and not others, right? this is whether we should have tax cuts. >> this happens all the time. totally incestuous between public and private constantly. look at places like illinois now where any company that stays is getting some kind of a deal except probably the small ones. >> except the small ones. any company of any size is getting a deal. >> maybe the rolls should be across the board nothing? >> no. >> a friend of mine, joannea kagan. >> didn't bob kraft do it in foxborough? >> i don't know enough. >>> let's talk about the next story. if you work on wall street and are considering growing a beard, an article in "the new york times" says that while beards are in fashion right now, that is not the case in the finance industry. i guess it's okay in fashion, it's okay in design. a lot of different areas if you're a helpster but in the fashion world, gentleman, the argument goes it looks like you have something to hide. >> you could
another massive package including more than $50 billion in spending to help offset sales tax hike. >>> mario draghi should be holding fire, despite the recent drop in inflation. investors eyeing the ecb's economic staff projections. >>> and i told you so. british chancellor george osborne may have reason to gloat. >>> and china's financial institutions are warning against trading bitcoins as the bank admits while there are risks, it could still use the currency. >> announcer: you're watching "worldwide exchange," bringing you business news from around the globe. hello. a warm welcome to the program. the government has just unveiled an $18.6 trillion yen stimulus package which includes 5.5 trillion yen in fresh spending measures. this is to offset the accuracy in the sales tax which is coming in in april which raises the rate effectively from 8% to 5%. it follows the unveiling of a 10.3 trillion package back in january. a number of measures will be expected as far as this package is concerned. particularly for those on the lower income as well. we will get those measures as soon as
a capitalist. and capitalism has been the winning formula -- >> tax free, save it up all those years, the inside build-up. this is what harold ford wanted when he was running for the senate and he was a democrat in the house. he was a smart moderate democrat. that's exactly what he wanted. >> because what you have is basically these terrible conflicts that you get when people basically make poor health care choices and want somebody else to bail them out. and when they own the plan, they begin to make healthy health care choices. you have to get rid of the moral hazards that we have all over the government, both in the way insurance is written today and the way it should be written. so that people have individual skin in the game and they can take these accounts and go anywhere with them. >> anywhere they want. >> isn't that more moral? half the people who are going to qualify are going into mistake. a terrible system. fairer system, everyone getting an h.s.a. better access than medicaid -- >> the mandate is you have to have an hsa. i'm okay with that. but nop mandates for the plan.
all boats. we don't need redistribution tax hikes, we don't need state run health care, more spending, lower the incentive barriers and bring us growth. here's another big problem for president obama, the millennials are abandoning him and obama care in droves. a new poll shows plunging support from young people. because the obama care website is in such bad shape, the government now has offered to bail out insurance company profit and losses, and in a possible second bailout, provide the insurers with guest estimates of health care subsidies. this whole story has gone haywire. all right? all of this and more coming up on "the kudlow report" beginning right now. >>> good evening, everyone. i'm larry kudlow. this is "the kudlow report." we're live here at 7:00 p.m. eastern, 4:00 pacific. president obama tries everything we can to get the attention away from the obama care, anything. today he went back to his old stand by, the rich. for more on the president's remarks about, quote, income inequality, end quote, let's bring in nbc's own steve handelsman. steve. >> reporter: larry, thanks
about it. >> check with your tax accountant. some stocks cannot really go in because of a business tax. you want to be sure. you've got to talk with your accountant about these. the stock had a not great quarter and it's been knocked down. and the master limited partnerships have been coming down. but i believe in rich kinder. rich kinder is not dick heckman. he had a terrific company around, this one's not it. rich kinder made a lot of people a lot of money. i'm not going to abandon that company. but i do honestly right now like linn energy right now. higher reats don't have to be the end of the world, conn's might be a microcosm. wouldn't you like to have a stock that goes up gigantically? or would you say i don't want that gain because rates are going higher? stay with cramer. >>> coming up -- nice view? hilton's more than $2 billion ipo is about to hit the street. are there better accommodations for your cash? or should you try and book a room in this newly minted spot? ♪ [ male announcer ] this december, experience the gift of exacting precision and some of the best offers of th
my source -- this is important, too. that tax reform is actually still more on the hot front burner than i thought. this source tells me dave camp coming out of ways and means, max baucus coming out of the senate finance committee are still bound and determined to come up with a pro-growth tax reform that would broaden the base and lower the tax rates. i can think of nothing that would help the economy more. what do you think about this? >> nothing in this near-term deal. there is an appetite for what you described particularly on the business side of the equation on corporate taxes. the white house has a plan to do precisely what you described, maybe not get the rate down the way you'd like it but they do have a plan. here's something i'd like to ask the representative about. i understand that you want to -- that there are republicans up there who want to keep the appropriations levels to where they are already. they're not that interested in this new deal. and i heard you criticizing the sequester in terms of the economic impacts. but my question is, it seems to me -- not trying t
part that was far bigger than their tax revenues would ever be able to support. their original dream, they were going to be able to grow into that spending. they didn't. so they had to cut spending. were there incredible costs? absolutely. gdp sunk dramatically. terrible youth unemployment. but those things were going to happen anyways because the governments had been borrowing. and delivering to people a standard of living that their productivity level was never going to be able to support. so decision day was going to come at some point. that's what it's led to when you see the garbage piled up in greece and spain because people go on strike because they're mad about the budget cuts. but where's the money going to come from? >> absolutely. well, the money would come from more borrowing. >> right. >> but, you know, i still question whether or not they're going to be able to do that next year. what are you hearing? >> i think ireland is a slam dunk. i think they'll be aible to do it. portugal is still questionable. greece, it's going to be up to whether or not their european partners
names. >> stocks up, too. you're not going to have that big tax loss fear. a lot of people saying i can find inexpensive tech, i don't need to go into the cloud. although apple is saying this is about ibm being wrong and apple being right. >> there has been an expectation of a china mobile deal. >> yes. >> unbeknownst to most people who hold the stock. that being said, 740 million china mobile subscribers, there is a fairly large audience they could conceivably be addressing to try to buy smartphones. >> do you remember the conference call that was the open rebellion against tim cook? it was withone of these things e i thought it was 1948 where stillwell had just lost china and now he's making a move. he did not lose china. >> we'll see. that fortune story has a lot of people talking about whether china mobile makes a big move in this direction, having not carried their phones till now. >> maybe samsung -- don't hear a lot about samsung having a revolutionary new phone. >> no, although they've got a lot of new patents, they're going to do the curve thing or fold thing. >> maybe they hav
nothing with intiethsmentes, nothing with tax reform, nothing with -- just paying for some, you know, trying to lessi inen the effect sequestration. >> look at the different points on the board. at this point in the game, we'll take that, right? >> and then the other thing that i just wanted to mention in following up on our conversations is what's going on in china? my man. my man. for the democratic party, i'm with biden. did you see, they send him over to china, boom, done. send my man joe over there who is like yeah, yeah, pats a couple can people on the back, tells a couple of jokes, takes back a couple of things he said and everybody is friends. he does it here, too, but it's already fixed over there. >> we have joe on here. >> carries out the plan and -- blow hardy. you send joe over, boom, done, fixed. thanks, joe, .and then they go out to a club probably. i don't know. anyway, back to wall street's top stories this morning, the november november jobs report current nonfarm payroll, it's 180. do you know the number? you know the number? no, you don't know the number a lot. >>
is traveling. >> enough not to pay taxes? >> no, no, i do pay taxes here. and the rates in new york with sales tax and everything and income taxes, state income taxes are roughly the same rate. so the tax equalization. i don't pay double. it gets offset. >> i don't know what that says, now we're equal to -- >> it's about 50%, basically is the marginal rate. >> you think that's fine? >> well, the british government reduced it from 50% to 45% and i thought that was wrong at the beginning of the conservative coalition because they said they were doing it to try and increase entrepreneurial activity. i think the best way to do that is a capital gains tax, not income tax. so i think that was misplaced. and i think at a time when people were worried about inequality and equality, which was high on the political agenda, i think it was the wrong thing to do. >> it brings up a lot of issues about income equality. and we know the one thing that solved income equality is growth and jobs. growth and jobs. not entitlements, not redistribution, it's growth and jobs. and some of the efforts to do it the othe
. had he to raise taxes in order to cut the $11 billion deficit. raising taxes is not something that's designed to make you very popular as well as cutting government spending. i spoke with the finance minister and he's pretty b buoyant. the public outcry on that, people are pretty pleased. i did ask him, is this just kicking the can down the road. take a listen. >> we have to reduce government expenses in a way that will not hurt all the services we want to give to the government. the fight for efficiency in all the governments around the world is a hard fight. we know now things we didn't know before about how to do it because we've been doing it for quite a while. this is why things are better now. i think we're going to have a new fiscal rule which will allow us to reduce government expenses in a way that will allow us not to raise taxes. >>ing where do you see that in order not to raise taxes in 2014, 2015. >> i can tell you we're not going to hurt the budgets of education because we are an education modulated government and of course health and welfare. these are the budgets th
. >> they have to cut some deals. sears was a big -- >> right. but the tax revenues, whatever you get there, you're probably losing it as people leave unless you do something this. don't get me started. >> well, the governor said even though the senate passed it, the house -- >> they didn't have an auto industry or a bailout in illinois. that's purely just mismanagement of the whole pension situation. >> but it's failing to put the money in they've promised he year. there's a lot of states that promise these things and -- is. >> the whole detroit thing we'll talk about. it's a tough one because on the nightly news you'll see every retiree. they'll say, if a dollar is cut out of my pension -- >> and by the way, tier not making massive pensions. >> i know that. but right now, there's no city services. >> and detroit is a unique situation because you have seen a loss of the people living there. you can no longer support the infrastructure that was there for 1.5 million people when you see the numbers decline. >> and the journal has a piece and it sounds cold and heartless, but if public unions are
up their manufacturing process to meet a boost ahead of the sales tax hike next april. however, other figures out today weren't encouraging either. japan's current cut showed a surprise $1.2 billion deficit for the month of october. they were up 18% on strong car sales in china and north america. a sharp increase on fuel imports wiped it out. >> thank you. have a good evening. >>> reminder on what's on the agenda in asia, the constitution day holiday. china's november data continues to trickle through with industrial output and fixed asset investment figures. plus, november sales for the big tech firms are also due out. >>> and you heard makika talking about the numbers. ami, thank you for joining us. do you dismiss this downward revision of gdp on the basis that it was a rise in inventories or slower rise in inventories? >> yeah. it seems the hard thing to do was that. there's also some talks about corporate capex not being as vibrant as some people were hoping for. if you look at the bigger picture, the yen's been weakening over the last year. seeing the impact of the yen in the nex
. >> are you going to push for a decline? sales to encome tax and then have a bank where you have a bank and put in $3 trillion, $4 trillion? you know can you do that if you push for it. >> i wouldn't doing repatriation holiday. i'd reform our tax code, bring the down, wut the loopholes whuch do that, you get some transition revenue. you can put that in a grand barg en kb. >> wool see youneck month. >> good morning, everybody. happy friday. what a rally we've got going here. whatever happened to fierce of tapering? we got cyclical groups, the telecomes, health care, defensive groups. we're up right across the board, folks. it's been a very strong rally right at the open but not strong inform a mr. one guy said it threads the needle perfectly. people putting together a list of what the skmik news looks like this week. here's a look for the bulls, gdp numbers very strong overall. auto sales, over 16 million, the highest in six years here. october home sales were the highest since june 2008. highest in manufacturing, highest in two and a half years and cyber sales were up 20% on monday. >>
? if amazon is 56% gain this year, who the heck wants to let it go, pay the taxes? why would you? you would have a humongous tax bill brought on by yourself, and so far not many losses do. if you're an institution, you want to show your clients that you own it. that makes the stock blessed. third, unlike most of the bricks and mortar outfits out there, amazon does have a real mystery. the possibly of a lights out quarter could be in the cards. walmart and target keep going down. finally, when it comes to the worth of amazon, there is a simple answer you can get. it's worth what people will pay for it. the answer is they'll pay $400, or $178 billion for the stock where it was trading this morning before the pullback. that's when the discipline comes in. as i've been saying for a while now, you have to recognize that the idea of a bubble in stocks has kept you out of so many winners that it's just unforgivable. if you're a performance manager. look, i can't blame anyone for wanting to sell amazon, or so many other stocks for that matter based on valuation. i know it's way too expensive for my
's plan to fix the wealth gap. taxes, higher minimum wage, all on the table and some remarks he has been giving. stallering facts on the income of lower level bank employees. guess who's paying them? you the taxpayers are to a surprising degree. we'll explain that. to sue in the house today. >> i am, ty. thanks. three key pieces of data out leaving about everybody scratching their heads. first up, the adp jobs report showing a gain of 215,000 private sector jobs. then october's new home sales, booming up 25.4%. but ism nonmanufacturing fell to 53.9 from 55.4 a month ago. here's one of the more worrisome factors for the market right now. take a look at the yield on the ten-year note, 2.84%. that has put some pressure at various times in the trading day on the dow jones industrial average. let's take a look at where it's sitting right now. the dow down about 37 points on the trading session. the s&p 500 is down almost 5 and the nasdaq composite is down a little better than 5. all three, though, are up more than 20% year to date. let's get to bob pisani at the nyse. bob, what are they talki
's aimed at offsetting the sales tax in april. and the shanghai composite pulled further ahead. meanwhile, the hang seng index added 0.1%. elsewhere, south korea and australia both ended just a tad lower. as for individual stocks, chinese property stocks came under some pressure after the official china securities journal reported beijing may remove caps on property prices next year, replacing them with supply side indicators and concerns still linger over a potential property tax system. now for some outperformers, let's take a look at the region's apple suppliers, seeing a strong boost from hopes that china mobile may reach a deal with apple to offer iphones. some phone displaymakers, cameramakers and case suppliers rebounded some 5% in today's trade. back to you, karen. >> sixuan, thank you very much update. charles has been telling us about this u.s. cash flood that you're expecting. are you saying buy u.s. assets, buy u.s. equities in 20 s14? >> things probably weaken at the moment because a lot of guys made a lot of money this year and they want to cash in and make sure they get the
people sign up online start to finish and for a time has felt like he's making progress. >> it tax like two minutes to get the results. this is what ear eligible for, would you like to enroll, and choosing a pair, some plans and premiums. it works very well now. so it's exciting that people can come in and in like, half an hour, find insurance. it's rewarting. >> a sort familiar with the situation says in fact over the last month about 100,000 people have been able to select plans on the troubled healthcare.gov, as they've made improvements. add that to the 231,000 confirmed enrollments from the states. that brings you to about 333,000. the big question now, though, is just what's happening on the back end, and sue, i can tell you insurers are still concerned they are not getting the right information when they get those transmittals over to them b. >> understandably so, bertha. thank you very much. we turn to that del re derailment. mary thompson is live on the scene in bronx, new york, with the continuing investigation. mary, over to you. >> reporter: what a difference a day makes. wh
'll get funding. not looking clear. unclear how it would be with taxes but not registered in the united states. >> thank you. we'll see you tomorrow. >> i'll see you tonight on "fast." "closing bell" is up next. >>> welcome to the "closing bell." i'm kelly evans at the new york stock exchange. >> i'm bill griffeth. we need an 11-point gain on the dow to hit an all-time high. >> we won't get it. >> i don't think so. >> we're 50 points away. >> anything's possible. >> the s&p 500 looks a little better. barely positive, if it closed higher it will be a couple points shy of an all-time high of its own. >> we have a lot of stories to get to this cyber money. have you bought something online today? fess up. >> there was a browser open to lord&taylor open when i got back. >> just happened to be. >> it wasn't me. someone upstairs was looking around. >> they were among the other 3100 people expected to buy something online today. we're tracking real time cyber monday numbers from ibm. we'll look at retail stocks that could be the biggest winners from this holiday seas
steam or at the end of the year for tax planning purposes. keep in mind, this is an 85% increase from the numbers we saw in october and the highest levels we have seen since may. definitely, a lot of selling happening. here is some big names we saw the most inside selling over the past three months. best buy, $200 million worth of shares sold by insiders over the past three months. amazon saw $400 million worth of shares, including jeff bezos selling a chunk, and google and microsoft, $830 million. some top dogs, eric schmidt, larry page,er is sergey brin. retail with coach, ceo lew frankfort, and biggest was richard kinder bought nearly $8 million worth of shares in september. the biggest buying we saw was in davida health care, the dialysis health care, warren buffett's berkshire hathaway added a huge chunk to their stake. they've been steadily adding over the last couple of months. maybe not a big surprise. traders said, some of this is seasonal, some is tax planning. when you've had stocks with such a big run, always interesting to note which stocks are seeing the biggest insider
at the moment. >> david cameron announcing today that he's not going to cut taxes for the middle classes. how much room, wiggle room is there going to be for the government, peter? much depends on what you think the economy is going to do this year and next ahead of the election. >> yeah. i think the likelihood is that the economy will continue to grow at a 2% to 2.5% late next year. that's decent, but it's not stellar. given all they have said about reducing the deficit over the next few years, it leaves room for cutting taxes. i think what the uk needs is a rebalancing towards investment and exports. the government realizes this and i think as a consequence it's unlikely to do things to throw additional fuel on the fire of consumption. >> do you think the government is doing enough? are you expecting any measures, say, on planning tomorrow from the troika? would that have helped? we had construction pmis this week very strong, rising like a phoenix out of the ashes. but many suppliers saying the supply side of that market is still very, very underperforming. >> yeah. i mean, when it comes t
and your tax rates, they're paying a very low tax rate. >> i know. i covered that as a reporter for the l.a. examiner when i wasn't covering homicide. and i said, boy, the rich people get richer and richer. at that point, i was very involved in the unions. it was an early precursors to what happened. i led a wildcat strike once in my life. >> did you really? >> yes. i did. we got completely annihilated. >> you've done so many things. >> i was one of these protesters. you have to boycott jp stevens? i was wearing jp stevens clothes. everything i did was -- >> one man at a time. >> it was such a disaster. every time i got involved with unions, it was bad. you didn't want me in your union. >> let's get to pisani and see what's moving dow down 25. >> modest declines, moving 279% on that better than expected gdp report. electronic stocks, housing stocks getting hit more than the rest of the markets. gold getting crushed again today. mentioned the gold miners, five-year lows that we've seen recently. i want to take up your question this morning, jim. because i think that's the right question on
think what will happen when you get to year end, a lot of muni funds will be pressured more, tax law selling -- >> lots. >> you'll do okay buying these funds at a discount. >> we won't necessarily see that pressure from the broader market, certainly. people maybe the last couple of years, any harvest, time is running out. >> there's still lots of things to harvest this year. lots of munis you can swap out of. munis are out. those are good places to swap into a different fund if you need to. take the loss, put it in your pocket if you don't need it and carry it forward. tax law accounting is huge in investing. >> we've been out of the muni market for the past 14 to 15 months when munis started getting back over 5% we've been a buyer. we've been aggressively buying municipal bonds. >> rob morgan any opinion on that before we go, quickly? >> absolutely. i think having a portfolio for individual investor tilted more toward short end and rising rate environment makes sense. i think detroit bankruptcy spells trouble more for retirees on pension plans more for than m
to pay the tax year? >> there's a lot of people positioning themselves for a big number on friday in the nonfarm payroll. they say why not teak profits. alternatively there's a vacuum of information and people say i got a great year. i'm concerned only that when you get to 3 there will be another wave of selling and that may be when you buy. that wave of selling. not this wave. >> do a little picking. always good to pick. >> we did come into this week giving all the reasons why there were very few reasons to sell. >> and that was bad. i fell into that complacency. by the way, there is one place where we saw -- i want to point out i like oil here. you have opec saying all the right things, you have no real cutbacks. you have this glut finally ending because you finally got the selling keystone part out of curbing. that is very good for the domestic oil companies and not so good for the refiners. >> the biggest losers this morning, valero -- >> a lot of people said goi goto get into refineries, i got to get into refineries. michelle caruso-cabrera yesterday with a fabulous piece abo
years instead of 10. dynamic versus status growing. different outcomes and tax policies. >> it seems, though, we've hit a wall here when it comes to fiscal policy in this country. one side says we're spending way too much. and they seem to have a point. the other side says, we need a better, more simplified tax policy. and they have a good point as well. what can you guys bring to the table that will help clarify things to end some of the gridlock that exists so badly in washington right now? >> this is a good question. the first thing you need to make a good decision is good analytics and good commentary. information to make a good decision. we hope to be able to bring really good information that's nonpartisan, reliable and authoritative to the process. that's point one. the other thing i would say is that from my perspective today, in terms of where we are with fiscal policy, both our long-term policy, which is undisciplined and has excessive spending going out forever, and our short-term policy which is tightening, are both wrong. in fact, what you want to do is precisely opposit
side of the businesses, we're hiring in audit and tax space as well. >> wow. obviously, this is going to continue to be a source of growth. the complexity today for any company. they almost have to have someone who's a specialist to deal with these kind of operations. i wonder, for the people you're hiring, we hear sometimes about this bifurcation of the labor market. do you find there's a surplus of workers? >> i hear for years we'll have trouble finding people and for years we're still hiring people. i think people have learned that noting and consulting are good professions. they go to school, even in the job reports it's amazing the differential in employment if you have a college degree versus not a college degree. so, they know there's jobs available right now in those industries. we're -- we seem to -- we seem to be doing very well hiring. the other key is developing them. >> so from your perspective, based on what you're seeing with your clients, how do you assess the economy and the jobs market right now? >> first, most ceos -- cfos are hesitant. their confidence waned in the
had nearly two percentage points of tightening. two percentage points of gdp and, you know, tax hikes and spending cuts last year. previous two years was local. this year less than half a percent. >> we make it smaller spending cuts. last is household wealth. increased again in the third quarter by almost $2 trillion. at the depths of the recession, it was neutral. now they're both going up double digit. that's going to add well over a percentage point to consumer spending. this is the time when growth should pick up. as you said this is also an important time for a couple of reasons because the hope is that cycle starts the broader, more sustainable, more widespread move that helps people get off jobless benefits as they run out. all of these extreme mers prosecute expiring so this has to be the year we see that pick up. food stamps and all of it. >> right. other things have been expiring before like the big fiscal stimulus package. a lot of that has come off already. it may not be great for investors. if you think about this past year, what happened? we
to 1896, jim. >> again, that's people i think not wanting to take tax -- not wanting to have to pay a tax bill. really, again, "usa today" wall street looks like pamplona. you think this is an article which says bubble, bubble, bubble. instead it is about how broad the advance is. it's a very positive article how the advance is different from some of the advance that is have led to big falls. very smart piece. >> the dow's gained year to date three times the gain of last year. do you expect that trend to continue into 2014? in any way? >> i think it's very hard if we forget we will have another washington bruising. right? do you think anything's gotten better there? i mean, we don't mention the health care. everyone talks about the health care site. i saw oracle mentioned as a possible problem in the "the new york times" piece and a thing that dazzles me is how we forget. right now. that there's a republican party that hates the president. but in another month we'll talk about that ian good for 6%, 7%, 8% decline. >> without a doubt and facing the same issues we faced a couple of months a
strong economic growth. in other words, the rising tide lifts all boats. we don't need redistribution tax hikes, we don't need state run health care, more spending, lower the incentive barriers and bring us growth. here's another big problem for president obama, the millennials are abandoning him and obama care in droves. a new poll shows plunging
rather see wage subsidies, direct government wage subsidies or some kind of negative income tax which is totally transparent but unfortunately, we do not have the time this evening to pursue all these options. pardon my skepticism about the seiu, however. i'm still going to stay with that. >>> now, if you tune in to nbc's "meet the press" this sunday, i will be talking about this with host david gregory. "meet the press" airs at 9:00 a.m. eastern time. many of the nbc stations. please check your local listings. >>> all right. many thanks to carrie wof ford and rick berman. appreciate your points of view. >>> the clock is really ticking on obama care. we know millions of americans have already lost their insurance effective january 1st because of obama care. for those people and anyone else who wants to sign up for new policies and be covered on new year's day, the deadline is actually december 23rd. that's not far away. doesn't say much about the sticker shock of the premiums, even speaker john boehner experiencing that today. take a listen. >> my health insurance premiums are going t
-term deficit reduction in this deal. we're talking about putting off decisions about raising taxes or cutting medicare and social security. we also have a last-minute hangup over unemployment benefits, the extension of unemployment benefits. democrats want that, republicans say they're not that serious about it, it's not clear whether or not democrats are going to put their foot down and say no deal until then. what i think we know is that there will not be a deal today. house leadership aide told me he expects early next week a deal to be announced by patty murray, the democratic chair of the budget committee in the senate. paul ryan, the republican budget committee chair in the house. then the house and senate pass it before christmas. they leave next week actually for their christmas break. so they would end the year on a positive note. it would dramatically reduce the risk of a government shutdown in january and does not resolve our long-term budget issues. >> does it resolve the debt ceiling deadline which is some time in early february? would that be taken care of here? >> don't think i
, december is a cruel month for losers and the tax law selling that i think are turning could be brutal here from now until year end and then it clears up. mdr is for me. stay with cramer. >>> coming up -- digital dollars. your cash is moving to the cloud and a new crop of companies are helping to transfer money around the world. but as more dollars are distributed online. cramer's got the play. [ male announcer ] here's a question for you: where does the united states get most of its energy? is it africa? the middle east? canada? or the u.s.? the answer is... the u.s. ♪ most of america's energy comes from right here at home. take the energy quiz. energy lives here. >>> we're an interactive show here. on monday i got a call from cody in florida. wanted to know what is happening with the downward sled ride in xoom, the billion dollar company that's basically an online money transfer service. i said i wasn't sure. i've got to take a closer look. xoom came public back in february. shot up immediately 21.50 on the first day of trading, for a while, a pretty darn good year, ran up as high as $3
slowly and into weakness. remember, december is a cruel month for losers and the tax law selling that i think are turning could be brutal here from now until year end and then it clears up. mdr is for me. stay with cramer. >>> coming up -- digital dollars. your cash is moving to the cloud and a new crop of companies are helping to transfer money around the world. but as more dollars are distributed online. cramer's got the play. every day we're working to be an even better company - and to keep our commitments. and we've made a big commitment to america. bp supports nearly 250,000 jobs here. through all of our energy operations, we invest more in the u.s. than any other place in the world. in fact, we've invested over $55 billion here in the last five years - making bp america's largest energy investor. our commitment has never been stronger. with my united mileageplus explorer card. i've saved $75 in checked bag fees. [ delavane ] priority boarding is really important to us. you can just get on the plane and relax. [ julian ] having a card that doesn't charge you foreign transaction fe
programs, raising rates, for republicans on taxes, but they have shuffling things around to relieve the budget sequester which both parties want to see happen. >> where is the area of compromise greatest, jon, and what are the issues they are willing to compromise on? >> it's different for different people. republicans and some democrats including chuck hagel at the pentagon who don't like the level of defense spending the way it's squeezed by the budget sequester and it gets squeezed more in 2014 by the sequester proportionately than domestic programs do. that gives some impetus for republicans to go along. democrats are raising the caps by an equal amount on the domestic side of the budget. these are things, priorities the democrats have for social programs, republicans have for defense, which are getting relieved and stitching together solutions to fill in the gaps financially even at a little deficit reduction on top of that, things like raising the fees for airline companies pay for for airport security, that's on the revenue side and on the spending side, curbing federal retir
cap plus the debt minus the cash divided by the earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation, amortization of 9.8. credit sweiuisse. the stock still has plenty of room to run. if that's how you want to value it. meantime, trading at 19 times next year's earnings, which is well below the five and ten-year averages and not too pricey considering it should be able to grow earnings at a 40% clip. the bears at goldman think it's time to sell masco and swap with nonresidential construction plays as the space starts to turn. i think they're wrong. i think they're wrong to write off masco and i agree with the bulls and believing this stock could have more room to run. i say stick with masco and stick with cramer. lou in oregon, lou? >> caller: boo-yah, skedaddy. >> i'm not booing, i'm louing. >> caller: hey, about six months ago you, recommended and i bought two stocks, american realty capital properties and also health care reit. i'm wondering, should i by more? >> i would. look, these are all about -- this group has been killed because of rates going higher. and when we get the ten
by the state, and there's a 30% federal tax break because it's a green technology. in other words, the price is cut in half. >> we have fedex. we have wal-mart. >> you have wal-mart? >> absolutely. >> staples? >> staples. >> so who was the first? >> google was the very first company. >> google was the first. >> yes. >> these four units have been powering a google data center for 18 months. they use natural gas, but half as much as would be required for a traditional power plant. k.r. told us that three weeks in at google, suddenly, one of the boxes just stopped. >> your heart just drops. >> did you panic? >> for a short while, yes. >> he fixed that. then there was another incident. >> the air filters clog up, and air is not coming into the system because the highway is kicking dirt. you just flip the system around, and the problem is gone. >> another company that's bought and is testing the bloom box so k.r. can work out the kinks is ebay. its boxes are on the lawn in the middle of its campus in san jose. >> these things fuel almost 15% of the power on this campus. >> john donahoe, the ceo o
with over the long-run. it wouldn't close any tax loopholes. those things have proven too partisan for these budget negotiators to tackle. yesterday, in the nfl, the kicker for the denver broncos made a 64-yard field goal. record for the nfl. this is more like a 6-yard field goal. they haven't kicked it yet. i do think they will before congress goes home. it is a minimum achievement for people to cheer about. >> john, it is interesting when you talk about some of the little sticking points here. one is the benefits for the long-term unemployed. that is making up a record percentage of the people in this country who are unemployed. do you get the sense that congress is looking at the jobs report and saying, hey, maybe we shouldn't move the needle on that right now? >> i think that is difficult in part, because when you look at the size of this deal, we are only talking about $90 billion over two years of lifting the sequester caps and replacing them. it is more of a reshuffle. the unemployment extension would cost $25 billion. that is a very large chunk of change to add on to that p
's refused food since the start of the protests. >>> there's a new tax by thailand's government to diffusion tensions in bangkok. allowing protesters inside, tear gas and rubber bullets have given away to calmer demonstrations. the protest leader says the fight will continue. meanwhile, consumer confidence has been hit dropping to a two-year low because of the unrest. the national transportation safety board says the new york commuter train that derails sunday was traveling at 82 miles per hour when it entered a curve where the speed limit was just 30 miles per hour. four people were killed and more than 60 injured. the ntsb says the train's brakes were working properly but were applied just seconds before the crash. >>> and pointing and clicking is becoming the preferred way to shop. adobe says u.s. cyber monday sales topped $2 billion for the first time, up 16% to 2.9 billion. adobe tracks visits to 2,000 websites. a record 18% came from mobile devices. other trackers report even higher numbers. ibm dish analytics, sales rose and amazon sales were up 44% as of 6:00 p.m. eastern and ebay's
important argument to have. by the way, higher education, the for profit guys are the ones paying taxes, both property and income taxes, whereas the not for property guys are the ones receiving subsidies. as far as i'm concerned, money is money. the only difference in private and public money is ideological. you draw a line between the two. public money becomes purer -- >> but it's worth ten cents on the dollar. >> i don't disagree with you. >> you're one of the old democrats. you're looking around saying what am i. >> i don't -- by the way, it's sort of what we were talking about earlier with iran. i don't think it's a question of choosing one or the other. i think you need to have a healthy balance of both. but if you start off with a regulatory bias against the for profit sector. >> you do. >> i understand, i don't disagree. >> i'm appealing to you, stand up and be -- >> i'm sitting down -- >> i think bill clinton was a republican. are you sure he was a democrat? >> i have no idea. >> senator kerrey will be with us for the rest of the program. >> do you want to be called senator or g
things other than taxes? that's something some republicans have said they can deal with. >> we'll see. >>> president obama wants to sell the american people on the relaunch of his troubled health care program today. he'll be starting speaking at 2:30 eastern time today. >>> let's check on the markets in anticipation of this. it wasn't too auspicious of a start yesterday. and again this morning, not so great, either. a lot of -- in the last two weeks, we have heard the word bubble like 100 times. so i don't know whether that initially just gets people to sell it off. it doesn't mean we're going down 5% or 10%, but at least it's starting with a little bit of trepidation. we have eight street weeks of gains, it probably wouldn't be surprising to not go nine. but down about 48 points is what we're looking at on the dow jones. the s&p is up 20% for the year. take a look at oil as we head into the all-important christmas season for retailers. people have a little more in their pockets as gasoline prices come down. the ten-year, which we always watch, given that some day somehow somewhere ja
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